This winter's weather conditions have revealed the fragility of the Maghreb's old cities and monuments. How can Maghreb governments and civil society ensure better upkeep of their historical districts?

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From the Panellists

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Historical and archaeological sites sinking in the wait for the reform of regimes and awareness of Maghreb populations (Comments: 1)

By: Mohamed Yehdih Ould Baba Ahmed

Successors live on the cultural legacy of their predecessors, as a genuine heritage that is linked to the personality and identity of the inheritor. Therefore, taking care of that heritage… more


Abdelaziz_karraky-250
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Maghreb citizens must realize the importance of preserving historical sites (Comments: 2)

By: Abdelaziz Karraky

The Great Maghreb has a large number of archaeological sites that have witnessed the succession of various human civilizations. It is not about scattered antiquities, as much as it is… more


Nabila
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When Mother Nature revolts against human irresponsibility (Comments: 1)

By: Nabila Saidoune

At the slightest downpour, earthquake or gust of wind, Mother Nature gets steamed up and calls us out to remind us anew about the importance of respecting life. The duty… more


Adel_rochdy
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The government, UN and volunteers to conserve historic sites and neighborhoods (Comments: 2)

By: Adel Rochdy

The conservation of historical sites, neighborhoods and monuments should be included in the list of duties taken in charge by the State, and among the obligations of citizens just like… more


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Anonymous About over 3 years ago

Let’s be concise, but let’s say meaningful things without turning around the bush. The dictators who seized power in the Maghreb countries after their independences set the only priority of establishing their authority and remaining in the saddle on the backs of their peoples in order to get rich. Human rights and the preservation of national heritage were not among their primary concerns. For example, the Tunisian movie “the sun of the hyenas” – which was filmed in 1978 – by Ridha Behi, tells the story of a small fishing village that suffered from vandalism. The inhabitants of that village were deprived of their properties, and their traditional town disappeared due to juicy contracts that were concluded between the authorities and foreign investors. Centuries of history had to make way for huge concrete buildings in order to receive massive numbers of European tourists that were seeking cheap sun. Wasn’t it possible to exploit empty areas? When the former Tunisian dictator Bourguiba was determined to build a mausoleum, he sent bulldozers to destroy the entire historic cemetery of Monastir located at the seaside. In that location, he built a Taj Mahal with a gigantic gold dome and huge esplanades to accommodate the pilgrims who will come in the future, according to him, to meditate on his tomb. While walking in the streets of Algiers, one sometimes feels like crying at the sight of the dilapidation of neighborhoods that once represented the glory of the city. During the civil war of the 90s, Algerian authorities had even applied the scorched-earth policy by setting fire to forests in order to dislodge the rebels. The natural balance was thus disrupted, wildlife was burnt, and flora disappeared. The vandalism that comes historically from foreign invaders was replaced by the vandalism coming from dictators.

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Anonymous About over 3 years ago

As long as the Maghreb regimes are powerless, and they remain the same, then we can protect anything.

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Anonymous About over 3 years ago

We need to protect our collective memory. However, it seems that the Arab Maghreb countries are distracted from the core issues that are related to humans and the environment by other fabricated and useless issues. The cultural and intellectual heritage is in danger of fading away, and is endangered by erosion. While colonialist countries take care of their remnants in our countries, like Portugal that allocates millions of Euros to the restoration of castles and fortresses in Morocco, what do Maghreb governments do for their peoples? And what cultural landmarks are they building to perpetuate their glory?

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