The utmost importance of the separation of powers

Kettab By: Mouhamed Lemine Kettab

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Morocco has cleverly learned its lesson from the continued turmoil in the Arab world, including Morocco itself. The country has recently drafted a new Constitution in line with the demands of the vast majority of Moroccan youth, and complying with most requirements of the inevitable democratic transition in this era of human history.

The overwhelming majority of Moroccans voted in the referendum held on July 1, 2011, in favor of the new Constitution. Morocco reviewed its political, social, economic and community institutions in this draft, confirming “the parliamentary nature of the Moroccan political system, which is essentially based on the principles of the nation’s sovereignty, the supremacy of the Constitution as the source of all powers, and the link between public office and accountability, as part of an efficient, rational constitutional system whose core elements are the balance, independence and separation of powers, and whose foremost goal is the freedom and dignity of citizens.”

This approach is accurate and relevant, because the separation of powers has become extremely important today, more than ever before, to consolidate democracy and achieve the desired objectives from the democratic transition, namely justice, fundamental freedoms, economic progress, social development, and intellectual and cultural advancement.

The separation of powers precludes all of the following scourges: excessive concentration of decisions, autocratic management of public affairs, totalitarianism, abuse, tyranny, patronage, nepotism, corruption, chaos, and the long-standing exclusion and marginalization of the Arab and Maghreb elites. All these factors had adversely affected the political and institutional development of the Maghreb and Arab world in general.

These are not the only gains from the separation of powers, which also paves the way for the supremacy of the law, political pluralism, and power alternation. Moreover, it ensures equal opportunities for citizens, empowers them, enables them to access decision-making positions, and involves them in the management of public affairs to actually contribute to shaping the future and determining the fates of their countries.

Therefore, the separation of powers is now the best course for engaging citizens, political actors, social partners, and community groups in the process of social mutation, and in the democratic transformation that is the main objective of the growing mobility in the Arab world, including the Maghreb.

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Anonymous About about 1 year ago

Thank God for Morocco’s intelligence! “Morocco has cleverly learned its lesson from the continued turmoil in the Arab world, including Morocco itself. The country has recently drafted a new Constitution in line with the demands of the vast majority of Moroccan youth, and complying with most requirements of the inevitable democratic transition in this era of human history”. That’s like saying: “The wolf has learned his lesson, so he promised the ewes not to eat them in the future. Then, he offered them democracy, and the ewes became the masters of the wolves”. Nobody believes such claims. Didn’t Moroccans hear of the slogan “the people want to overthrow the regime”? Or maybe the wind of freedom and dignity that started from Tunisia towards the east first, didn’t reach Morocco, and might come back to it as a huge storm, like it did to Egypt and Libya. Didn’t Morocco learn its lesson? Changing the Constitution won’t change anything as long as the symbols of repressing freedoms are still wandering freely…

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Anonymous About 4 months ago

Yuck!

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